Foreword David Jacobs

(Marta Moreno)
Pages 4 and 5
Affected accent: not natural but done to impress other people
Co-educational: the system of educating students of both sexes in the same class or college
Felt (n): thick soft cloth made from wool, hair, or fur fibres that have been rolledand pressed flat (fieltro).
Constabulary: the police of a particular place
Lace (v): to put a small amount of strong alcohol, a drug, or poison into a drink or food, sometimes secretly (coffee laced with brandy)
Lock, stock and barrel: including every part of a particular thing, situation, place etc
Mistress: a woman school teacher
Pinching: to squeeze someone’s skin between your thumb and finger so that it hurts them
Prospect: the possibility that something will happen, especially something positive.
Shoving: to push someone or something with force
Sly: a sly smile, look, or remark shows that the person doing it knows something that other people do not know
Wander off: to move away from a place where you are usually, or where people expect you to be.
Whilst: while

Introduction: Pam Schweitzer

(Marta Moreno)
Pages 6 and 8
Assuage: to make an unpleasant or painful feeling less severe
At random: without a particular method, pattern, or purpose
Billet: a place, usually someone’s house, that soldiers (in this case, children) live in temporarily, especially during a war
Contributor: someone who gives money, goods, or their time or effort in order to help to achieve something
Disruption: a situation in which something cannot continue because of a problem
Far afield: far away, especially from where you live or are staying
From pilar to post: to a lot of different places or people in a way that is not organized or helpful
Hair-raising: very frightening, but often exciting at the same time
Hitherto: until the present time
Household: the people who live in a house or flat when they are considered as a single unit
Memorabilia: objects that you collect because they belonged to someone famous or are connected with something that interests you
Poignantly: giving you feelings of sadness
Poky: small and uncomfortable
Recall: to remember something
Relish (v): to get great pleasure or satisfaction from something
Resilience: someone’s ability to become healthy, happy, or strong again after an illness, disappointment, or other problem
Snapshot: a photograph taken without the use of professional equipment
Stretch: a continuous period of time
Tape: a plastic case called a cassette containing tape that you can use for recording something or on which something has been recorded
The luck of the draw: used for saying that people have limited control over what life bringsthem
Treble (v): if something trebles, or if you treble it, it becomes three times biggerthan it was before

June Biggs

(Irene Garrido 5M330)
Page 28
Billet (v): to obtain lodging; stay
Mind (v): to look after someone or something for a short time
Posh: someone who is posh talks or behaves in a way that is typical of people from a high social class. This word often shows that you do not like people like this

Barbara Birchall

(A. Manzano 5L730)
Pages:30-31
Agoraphobia: /ˌæɡ(ə)rəˈfəʊbiə/a fear of going outside and being in public places
Balloon: /bəˈluːn/a large strong bag filled with gas or hot air that can float in the air. Some balloons have a large basket hanging under them in which people can travel
Barrage: /ˈbærɑːʒ/A military or armed attack: air raid, air strike, attack...
Bonfire: /ˈbɒnˌfaɪə(r)/a large fire built outside for burning waste. People also have bonfires at parties or celebrations.
Drip: /drɪp/to produce small drops of liquid
Garden shed: /ˈɡɑː(r)d(ə)nʃed/a small building for storing garden tools, bicycles, and other equipment
Inch: /ɪntʃ/a unit for measuring length. An inch is equal to 2.54 centimetres.
Outstanding: /aʊtˈstændɪŋ/extremely good or impressive
Pigswill: /ˈpɪɡˌswɪl/waste food that is used for feeding pigs
Row: /rəʊ/a series of people or things arranged in a straight line
Spud: /spʌd/a potato
Wrap: /ræp/to cover something by putting something such as paper or cloth round it

Jim Brittain

(Ana Belén Del Pozo)
Pages: 32-35
Aircraft: a plane, helicopter, or other vehicle that flies
Airfield: a place where aircraft arrive and leave, especially military or private aircraft
Aside: used for telling someone that what you are mentioning is not as important as what you are going to say next
Barn: a large building on a farm where animals, crops, or machines are kept
Blade: the thin sharp part of a knife, tool, or weapon that cuts things
Boast: to proudly tell other people about what you or someone connected with you has done or can do, or about something you own, especially in order to make them admire you
Cellar: a room under a building, below the level of the ground, usually used for storing things
Chemist: a shop that sells medicines, beauty products, and toiletries
Disillusioned: disappointed because you have discovered that someone or something is not as good as you had believed
Embrace: to accept and include something
Field: an area of land used for keeping animals or growing food
Fosterers: people who looked after children as part of their family for a period of time because the children’s parents could not look after them
Glimpse: an occasion when you see someone or something for a moment only
Household: the people who live in a house or flat when they are considered as a single unit
Lass: a girl, or a young woman
Liaison: the exchange of information between people or organizations, so that they understand each other and work well together
Maid: a woman whose job is to clean rooms, serve meals, wash clothes etc in a house
Orchard: an area of land where fruit trees are grown
Paddock: a small field where horses are kept and allowed to eat grass
pantry: a small room for storing food, usually next to the kitchen
Plum: small round fruit with purple, red, or yellow skin and a large hard seed inside. It grows on a plum tree.
Refreshed: feeling more lively and comfortable after you have rested, washed, eaten etc
Renewal: the process of starting something again after a pause
Runway: a long road used by planes when they land and take off, usually at an airport
Scullery: a room next to the kitchen that some old houses have, used for washing dishes or clothes
Supply: an amount or quantity of something that is available to use
Tuition: the work that a teacher does when they teach a particular subject, especially to one person or to a small group
Unhitch: to remove something from the thing that is holding or fastening it
Vicinity: the area near a particular place

Rose Brittain

(Laura Arjona)
Pages 35-36
Billeting officer: A person whose job was to find suitable houses in all areas that were receiving evacuees.
Knit (verb) : to make something such as a piece of clothing using wool and sticks called knitting needles
Help yourself to sth: you can take as much as you want without asking permission
Lady of the manor: lady having jurisdiction of a manor; also, the wife of a manor lord.
Object (verb): to be opposed to something, or to express your opposition to it in words.
Pond: an area of water similar to a lake but smaller, especially one that has been built artificially
W.V.S. : The Royal Voluntary Service (known as the Women's Voluntary Services (WVS) from 1938 to 1966) is a voluntary organization concerned with helping people in need throughout England, Scotland and Wales.

Allan Burnett

(Ana Belén Del Pozo)
Pages: 36-38
Air Raid (noun): an attack in which one or more planes drop bombs on a place
Amenities (noun): something that makes it comfortable or enjoyable to live or work somewhere
Apprehension (noun): a feeling of worry or fear that something bad might happen
Billet (noun): a place, usually someone’s house, that soldiers live in temporarily, especially during a war
Blitz (noun): a sudden military attack
Bossy (adj): someone who is bossy keeps telling other people what to do, in a way that annoys them
Breadwinner (noun): the person who earns the money to support a family building
Disprove (verb): to prove that something is not correct or true
Escalator (noun): a set of moving stairs that take people from one level to another in a large building. A machine that you ride in to move between levels is a lift.
Farce (noun): a situation or event that is silly because it is very badly organized, unsuccessful, or unfair
Fare (noun): the money that you pay for a journey
Groceries (noun):food and other goods for the home that you buy regularly
Hamlet (noun): a small village
Herded (verb): to move people as a group from one place to another
Hissing (verb): to say something in a low angry voice
Jubilantly (adj): extremely happy because something good has happened Livestock
Livestock (noun): animals such as cows, sheep, and pigs that are kept on farms
Locomotives (noun): the vehicle at the front of a train that pulls it
Marvelous (adj): extremely enjoyable or exciting
Misunderstanding (noun): a failure to understand someone or something correctly
Omnibus (noun): an old word meaning a ‘bus’
Prosaic (adj): ordinary and lacking imagination or excitement
Sans (preposition): without
Shepherded (verb): to take someone to a place that you want them to go to
Shrink (verb): to become smaller in size
Tenement (noun): a large building in a city, containing several flats
Tiresome (adj): making you feel annoyed or bored
Tramcar (noun): a long narrow vehicle that travels along metal tracks in the middle of a street and is used as public transport in some places
Wheeze (verb): to breathe in a noisy way that is uncomfortable for you, usually because you are ill

Jean Carter

(Ana Belén Del Pozo)
Pages: 40-43
Assemble (verb): to bring a group of things or people together in one placefor a particular purpose
Awkward (Adj): difficult to deal with and embarrassing
Beg (verb): to ask for help, an opportunity etc in a way that shows you want it very much
Gingerbread (noun): a type of cake made with ginger
Isolation (noun): the state of being separated from other people, or a situation in which you do not have the support of other people
Itchy (adj): if you feel itchy, you have an unpleasant feeling on your skin thatmakes you want to scratch it
Nit (noun): the egg of an insect called a louse that people sometimes have in theirhair
Scabies (noun): a disease in which your skin becomes very itchy (=you want to rub it with your nails)
Scolarship (noun): an amount of money that an organization gives to someone so that they can study at a particular school or university
'Take the gilt off the gingerbread': to ​spoil something that is in every other way ​enjoyable
Warn (verb): to make someone conscious of a possible problem or danger so that they will not be hurt
Youngsters (noun) : a child, or a young person

Bill Clapham

(Mónica Bandera)
Pages 44-46
Newsreel – a news report on film that was shown in cinemas in the past
Remainder - the part of something that is left after the rest has gone or been finished
Allotment - a small piece of land in a town that you can rent and use for growing vegetables
Lom - to appear as a large shape that is not clear, usually in a threatening way
Rehearshal - an occasion when you practise for the performance of a play, concert, opera etc
Haversack - a large bag that you carry on your back or over one shoulder, for example when you go walking or camping
Shilling - a small unit of money that was used in the UK until 1971
Pigsty – 1. a small building on a farm where pigs are kept 2. a place that is very dirty or untidy
Shortage - a lack of something that you need or want

Joan Clarkson

(Mónica González)
Pages 46-47-48-49
Barn: a large building on a farm where animals, crops or machines are kept.
Be cross (v): to be angry
Billet: a place, usually someone's house, that soldiers live in temporarily, especially during the war.
Copper: a chemical element that is red-brown metal. It is used specially for making wire or pipes.
Dainty: small and attractive in a delicate way ("dainty clothes").
Darn (v): to repair a piece of clothing by sewing stitches across the hole.
Garland of flowers: a ring of flowers that you wear around your head or neck or use for decorating something.
Garter: a ring made of elastic that you wear around your socks or stocking to prevent it from falling down.
Great deal: large quantities or amounts
"She was not interested a great deal in me as a child"
Idle hands: "The Devil makes work for idle hands" used for saying that people who are bored or do not have enough work will start doing things that they should not do.
Lull: a quiet period during a very active or violent situation.
Perm (v): to use chemicals to make straight hair stay curly.
Sewerage: a system of pipes and passages that carry waste and used water from buildings
Spiteful: unfriendly, cold, hostile.
Straw: the yellow stems of dried crops such as wheat; reed: a tall thin plant that grows near water
Thatched cottage: its roof is covered with dried plants such as straw or reeds.
Withdrawn: very quiet and preferring not to talk to other people.

Valerie Clayton

(Laura Arjona)
Page 49
Blissful: giving you great pleasure.
Cowslips: a wild plant with yellow flowers
Get cross with: angry. This word is used mainly by children or when speaking to children
Pincushion: a small soft object in which you keep pins and needles
Primroses: a pale yellow flower that grows wild in the countryside
Scrub (verb): to wash or clean something by rubbing it hard, especially with a brush

Harry Cole

(Mónica Gónzalez)
Pages 50, 52 and 53
Assemble my wits (v): to try to start thinking clearly
Attire: the clothes that someone is wearing
Bear out (v): (born/e), to show or agree that something is true or that someone is telling the truth
Beleaguer (v): to cause constant or repeated trouble for a person, business, etc..
Be put on display: be put in a place that is able to be seen by many people
Billow (v): to be filled with air and swell out like a sail, to become larger, grow, expand
Blitz: a military or armed attack (air raid, air strike)
Brewery: a company that makes beer
Clad: to wear a particular type of clothing
Cockney: someone born in the East End (eastern central part) of London, especially a working class person
Crumbling : being broken into very small pieces
Distraught: extremely worried, upset or confused
Endeavour: to try very hard to do something
Gingerly: in a very slow and careful way, usually because you are injured or afraid of something
Grope our way through: to try to get to a place by feeling the way with your hands
Huddle: to move close together in order to stay warm, feel safe or talk
Laceration: a deep cut in someone's flesh
Masonry: the bricks or stones that make a building, wall or other structure
Pitch black: completely black or dark
Puzzle (v): to make someone worry and think hard, by being difficult to understand
Rattle: if something rattles it makes short sharp knocking sounds as it moves or shake
Relent: to change your mind about not allowing something to happen or not letting someone do something
Ruffle the hair (v): to move someone's hair in a friendly way
Shell: a weapon consisting of a metal container filled with a substance that explodes, fired from a large gun
Shrapnel: small pieces of metal that fly out of a bomb or bullet when it explodes
Shuffle: to walk slowly and noisily without lifting your feet
Splinter: a small sharp piece of material such as wood or glass that has broken off a bigger piece
Squarely: directly
Take stock of the situation: to spend some time thinking about the situation that you are in before you decide what to do next
Tenement: a large building in a city containing several flats
Thud: a loud sound made by something heavy falling or hitting something
Transpire (v): (formal) to happen, come about, occur
Unscathed: not harmed or damaged by something bad that has happened
Anne Conway
(Laura Jaramillo)
Pages 54-58
BAWL (v) to cry loudly, especially in a way that annoys other people
BONY (ad) a bony part of the body is so thin that the shape of the bones can be seen
BOUNCE (v) if a person or vehicle bounces or is bounced, they move up and down as if they are on springs
BUNDLE (v) to make someone go to a particular place by pushing them in a quick, rough way
CANE (v) to punish a child in school by hitting them with a stick
CHORE (n) an ordinary job that must be done regularly
CUDDLE (v) if you cuddle someone, you put your arms round them and hold them close to show that you like or love them
DETACHED (n) a detached house is not joined to another house
DOODLEBUG (n) a flying bomb used by the Germans for attacking Britain in the Second World War
GUARDED (tones/comments) (adj) not giving much information because you do not want someone to know everything about something
HANG AROUND (Phrasal verb) to spend time in a place waiting or doing nothing
HAYLOFT (n) the area at the top of a farm building used for storing hay
INCENDIARY (n) a bomb or missile that causes a fire when it hits something
LOCKED AWAY (Phrasal verb) to put something in a place or container which you fasten with a lock
LOCKED UP (Phrasal verb) to put someone in a prison, or in a hospital for mentally ill people
MINNOW (n) a small fish that lives in rivers and lakes
ORCHARD (n) an area of land where fruit trees are grown
PAT (v) to touch someone gently several times with a flat hand to show that you care about them or want to make them feel better
PINAFORE (n) a piece of clothing that a woman wears over her clothes to keep them clean when she is cooking
PINE (v) to feel very sad because you cannot be with someone who you love
PLUMP (ad) slightly fat, in a pleasant way. This word is often used to avoid saying fat, which is not considered polite
RANGE (n) a very large old-fashioned piece of kitchen equipment with several ovens heated by a fire
SHELTER (n) a place where people are protected from bad weather or from danger
SPANK (v) to hit someone, especially a child, on their bottom (=the part of the body they sit on) with the palm of your hand
SQUEAL (v) to make a long high sound
STEAM (n) a continuous flow of people or things
STOCKY (adj) a stocky person looks strong but is not tall
STRING (n) thin rope, usually made of twisted fibres and used for tying things together
TAWNY (Adj) between yellow and brown in colour
THATCH (v) to cover a roof of a building with dried plants such as straw or reeds
TILT (v) to move something so that one side is lower than the other
TRANSFIXED (adj) so surprised, shocked, or interested that you continue to look at or listen to someone or something without moving

Rosemary Davis

(Laura Jaramillo)
Pages 59-61
BLITZ (n) a sudden military attack
BOISTEROUS (Adj) lively and noisy
COMPRISE (v) to consist of two or more things
CRAMP (Adj) small and crowded
CROUCH (v) to move your body close to the ground by bending your knees and leaning forwards slightly
DREAD (v) to feel very worried about something that might happen or something that is going to happen
ELBOW (n) the part in the middle of your arm, where it bends
GRASP (v) to take and hold something or someone very tightly
HANDKERCHIEF (n) a small square piece of cloth or paper used for wiping your nose or eyes
LAD (n) a boy or a young man
LOOM (v) To be certain or likely to happen soon
MISDEMEANOUR (n) an action that is bad or wrong, but not in a serious way
PONDEROUS (Adj) ponderous writing or speech is serious and boring
PRAYER (n) the words that someone says when they are speaking to God
PUMP (v) to make liquid or gas move into or out of something
RAID (n) a sudden short military attack
RECOLLECT (v) to remember something that has happened
SPIT (v) to force some of the clear liquid called saliva out from your mouth
STROLL (v) to walk without hurrying, often for pleasure
UNCANNILY (Adv) Unusual in a strange way
WELL (n) a deep hole that is dug in the ground to provide a supply of water

Pat Fawcett

Pages 66, 67, 68, 69 and 70
(Francisco José Jiménez Pozo)
Dreadful: (adjective) very unpleasant
To fathom out: to understand something complicated or mysterious
Buff: a very light yellow-brown colour, similar to the colour of sand
Cardboard: very stiff thick paper, used especially for making boxes
To lace: to be tied or fastened using a lace
To pump: to push something up and down
Benches: a hard seat for two or more people, usually outside in a public place
To tear up: to push something up and down with an action likepumping
A tin: a closed metal container for a food product that you open with a tin opener.
Raisins: a dried grape
A jug: a container from which you pour liquids such as water or milk.
A cart: a vehicle with four wheels and no roof that is pulled by a horse and is used for carrying things
To clank: if a heavy metal object clanks, or if you clank it, it makes a shortloud sound. (Here you can listen to the sound: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/clank)
The hum: a low continuous noise made by a machine
A snatch: a short piece of something that you hear
Copper: a chemical element that is a red-brown metal. Its symbol is Cu and it is used especially for making wire or pipes.
The scullery: a room next to the kitchen that some old houses have, used for washing dishes or clothes
To snuggle: to put yourself into a warm, comfortable, safe position, for example by sitting with your body against someone else’s body or by sliding your body down under the covers on a bed
A chink : the sound that is made when two glass or meta lobjects hit each other (you can listen to it here: http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/chink_1)
To cordon off: to form a cordon around an area
A bucket: a round open container with a handle, used for carrying liquid and substances such as sand or soil
A spade: a toy that children use for digging in sand or earth
Conkers: the large shiny brown seed of the horse chestnut tree
To quiet down: to become less noisy, active, or busy, or to make someone or something less noisy, active, or bussy.
Anemones: a small plant with white, red, or purple flowers that are shaped likecups
Bluebells : a plant that grows in the countryside or in gardens, with small blueflowers shaped like bells

Tony Fawcett

Pages 70, 71, 72, 73 and 74
(Francisco José Jiménez Pozo)
Bewildering: a bag that you carry on your back.
Knapsack: a bag that you carry on your back.
To billet: to go to a place, usually someone’s house, where especially soldiers live in temporarily during a war.
Parlour: a room in a house, used for entertaining guests
Paraffin: a clear oil with a strong smell that is used for fuel.
Stove: a machine or a piece of equipment that provides heat for cooking orheating a room
Aliens: someone who is not a citizen of the country they are living in
Bureau: a piece of furniture with drawers and a top part that opens to make a writing table
Shillings: a small unit of money that was used in the UK until 1971
Goose: a large white or grey bird with a long beakcalled a bill. A male goose is called a gander and a young goose is called a gosling. A group of geese is called a flock. The meaning of this word can be also the meat of a goose.
Wholesome: (adjective): wholesome food is food that is good for you
Bramble: a bush with thin sharp points on its long branches, especially one thatproduces blackberries (=small soft black or purple fruits)
In earnest: more seriously, or with more energy and determination than before
Dangling: (adjective) if you dangle something, or if it dangles, it hangs or swings without anything stopping it
Alight: (adjective) burning
To spare: to prevent someone from experiencing an unpleasant, painful, or embarrassing situation or feeling
Dingy: a dingy place or object is rather dark in an unpleasant way and often looks dirty
To wheel: to move something that has wheels by pushing it
A maid: a woman whose job is to clean rooms, serve meals, wash clothes etc in a house
A hike: a long walk in the countryside
To stalk: to hunt a person or animal by following them without being seen
A fern: a plant with leaves shaped like feathers and no flowers
To ease up/off: if something unpleasant or annoying eases off, it becomes less unpleasant or annoying
To court: to have a romantic relationshipwith someone, especially someone that you get married to late
To own up: to admit that you have done something bad or embarrassing
Bum: the part of your body that you sit on
Swift: moving quickly
Stroke: a hit made with someone’s hand, a stick, or another object
A Row: a series of people or things arranged in a straight line
Hooks: a curved piece of metal or plastic for hanging things on
To tug: pull someone or something by making a short strong movement
Boater: a circular hat with a low flat top and a wide brim, usually made of straw(=dried stems of wheat) for wearing in sunny weather
To tempt: to make you want to do or to have something, especially something that is not good for you
WRAF: in the UK, the Women’s Royal Air Force
To Blitz: to attack a place using planes that drop bombs

Margaret Gardiner

(Loly Reyes Molina)
Pages 75 and 76
Black-out: a period during a war when lights in streets and buildings are turned off so that an enemy cannot see them at night.Bleak: bleak weather is very cold and grey.Cargo: used about ships, planes etc that carry goods.Coffin: a long box in which a dead person is buried.Convoy: a group of vehicles or ships travelling together, often with other vehicles or ships providing protection for them.Deck: the outside top part of a ship that you can walk on.Display: (verb) to put something in a particular place so that people can see it easily.Eerie: strange and mysterious, and sometimes frightening.Evolve: (verb) to gradually change and develop over a period of time.Kipper: a herring (type of fish) that has been preserved in salt and smoke.Pram: a large object with four wheels that a baby can lie in while you push it around. The American word is baby carriage.Rig up: (verb) to make something quickly out of whatever you can find.Surreptitiously: in a secret way, so that others will not notice.

Dave Gelly

(Estefanía Román)
Pages 77 and 78
Acquaintance /əˈkweɪntəns/ Conocido
Amid /əˈmɪd/ In the middle of sth
Clump /klʌmp/ A small, close group or cluster, esp. of trees or other plants
Cosiness /ˈkəʊzɪnɪs/ Intimacy
Grubby /ˈgrʌbɪ/ Dirty
Household /ˈhaʊshəʊld/ The people of a house taken as a group
Leek /li:k/ A plant of the amaryllis family, related to the onion, having a rounded bulb and leaves used in cooking
Onwards /ˈɒnwədz/ Also onward. Toward a point ahead or in front
Outer /ˈaʊtəʳ/ Located on or toward the outside
Water butts: Barril recolector de agua de lluvia

Pola Haward

(Patricia Merino 5L730)
Pages 82 - 87
Adamant: (adjective) determine not to change your belief or decision about something.
Amidst: (preposition) between, among.
Begrudgingly: (adverb) jealous, envious.
Bewildered: (adjective) confused and not certain what to do.
Billet: (verb) to put soldiers in a billet.
Blame: (verb) to say or think that someone or something is responsible for an accident, problem, or bad situation.
Blanket: (noun) a thick cover made of wool or another material that you use to keep warm in bed.
Burst into tears: (phrasal verb) star to cry.
Cling: (verb) to hold onto someone or something tightly with your hands or arms, for example because you are afraid.
Clutching: (verb) to hold someone or something firmly, for example because you are afraid or in pain, or do not want to lose them.
Compulsory: (adjective) something that is compulsory must be done because of a rule or law.
Drag: (verb) to make someone leave or go to a place when they do not want to.
Drill: (noun) a way of training people so that they know what to do when there is an emergency.
Eager: (adjective) very keen to do something or enthusiastic about something that will happen.
Endeavour: (noun) attempt, effort.
Fetch: (verb) to go and get something.
Fib: (noun) a lie about something that is not important.
Grasping: (adjective) only interested in getting as much money as possible.
Grim: (adjective) very serious and unfriendly.
Homeward: (adverb) in the direction of home.
Hubbub: (noun) the noise of a lot of people talking at the same time, especially when they are angry or excited.
Label: (noun) a piece of paper or material fastened to an object that gives information about it.
Lodging: (noun) a place that you pay to live in temporarily, for example when you are visiting an area.
Mackintosh: (noun) anorak, blazer.
Makeshift: (adjective) made using whatever is available and therefore not very good.
Mischief: (noun) behaviour or play, especially of children, that causes trouble but not serious harm to other people.
Neat: (adjective) carefully arranged and looking nice.
Rate: (noun) the number of times something happens, or the number of examples of something within a particular period of time.
Relieve: (verb) to make pain or another bad physical feeling less unpleasant.
Roughly: (adverb) used for showing that an amount, number, time etc is not exact.
Sandy: (adjective) covered with sand, or consisting mostly of sand.
Scheme: (noun) a plan that is developed by a government or large organizationin order to provide a particular service for people
Standards: (noun) a level of quality or achievement, especially one that people generally consider normal or acceptable.
Suffocation: (noun) asphyxiation.
Tentatively: (adverb) uncertain, retiring.
Twiddled: (verb) to twist or turn something in a bored or nervous way.
Unaware: (adjective) not realizing that something exists or is happening.
Uneasiness: (noun) anxiety.
Ushered: (verb) to lead someone politely somewhere, for example into a room or towards a seat.
Wave: (verb) to move your hand to say hello or goodbye or as a signal.

Doreen Henry

(Belén Leiva)
(Pages 90-91)
a mop of - a lot of thick untidy hair
billet (verb) - to put soldiers (in this case, children) in a place, usually someone’s house forliving in temporarily, especially during a war
bun - a small round cake, especially with a sweet sticky surface
daunting (adj.) - something that is daunting makes you worried because you think that it will be very difficult or dangerous to do
imp - an imaginary creature that looks like a small child and likes to have fun by behaving badly
mantleshelf - ledge above a fireplace
musty (adj.) - smelling unpleasant and not fresh
pamper (verb) - to receive a lot of care and attention, often so much that it spoils your character
skirmish - a fight, an argument
snivel (verb) - to cry or to complain, especially in a way that seems weak or annoying
stale - when the bread is old and no longer fresh
stunned (adj.) - shocked
tantalizing - making you feel excited or hopeful about having something that you want, often
wail (verb) - to shout or cry with a long high sound to show that you are in pain or are very sad

Heather Hodge

(Verónica Ruiz)
Pages 101 – 108.
Assemble: to bring a group of things or people together in one place for a particular purpose.
Background: the type of family, social position, or culture that someone comes from.
Barrel: a round wooden, metal, or plastic container with a flat top and bottom, used for storing liquids.
Blancmange: a soft sweet food eaten as a dessert. It is made mainly from milk and sugar.
Bobbysoxer: a teenage girl.
Bump into someone: to meet someone unexpectedly.
Bunk: a narrow bed, often fixed to a wall.
Buns: a small round piece of bread.
Cuddle: if you cuddle someone, you put your arms round them and hold them close to show that you like or love them.
Drown (V): to sink under water and die.
Dutifully: careful to do things that other people ask or expect you to do.
Eager: very keen to do something or enthusiastic about something that will happen.
Encourage: to suggest that someone does something that you believe would be good.
Fussy: only satisfied if things are exactly as you want them to be.
Greengrocer: someone whose job is to sell fruit and vegetables in a shop called a greengrocer’s.
Handwriting: the particular way that someone writes using a pen or pencil.
Hose: a very long tube for carrying water to a garden or a fire.
Ice rink: a large flat area of ice inside a building, where people can go to ice-skate.
Ounce: a unit for measuring weight, equal to 28.35 grams. The written abbreviation for ounce is oz.
Pal: a friend.
Pitted: a pitted surface has small marks or holes in it.
Quarantined: to keep a person or animal in quarantine.
Raid: a sudden short military attack.
Ravine: a very deep narrow valley with steep sides.
Relief: a relaxed happy feeling that you get because something bad has not happened or a bad situation has ended.
Row: a series of people or things arranged in a straight line.
Rush out: to quickly produce something and make it available for people to buy.
Self assured: confident and relaxed because you are sure of your abilities.
Sledge: a vehicle that you sit on to travel over snow. It has long pieces of wood fitted to the bottom, instead of wheels.
Sleigh: a vehicle that is pulled by animals and used for travelling over snow.
Shelter: a temporary place to live for people who do not have their own homes, or for animals who have been treated in a cruel way.
Shutters: a cover that can be closed over the outside of a window.
Steaming: very hot.
Stodgy food: This kind of food is heavy and makes you feel too full.
Stuff: a variety of objects or things.
Supplies: an amount or quantity of something that is available to use.
Trunk: a large strong box with a lid used for storing things or for carrying them when you travel.
Wary: careful or nervous about someone or something because you think they might cause a problem.
Wistful: used when you are thinking about something that made you happy in the past.
Yard: an enclosed area around a large building where people can do activities outside.

Doris Hollands

(Laura Arjona)
Page 109
Beetroot: the round dark-purple root of a vegetable that is cooked and eaten cold, especially in salads.
Creepy-crawly: an insect. This word shows that you dislike or are afraid of insects
Palliases: A thin mattress filled with straw or sawdust.
Rule with a rod of iron (verb): to control someone or something in a very strict way
Jim Hughes
(Loly Reyes Molina)
(pag: 110, 111)
Billet: a place, usually someone’s house, that soldiers live in temporarily, especially during a war.
Church warden: is a lay official in a parish or congregation of the Anglican Communion, usually working as a part-time volunteer.
Concern about: a feeling that you care about someone and want them to be happy and well.
Den: a secret place where children go to play.
Ferret: a small thin furry animal with a long tail that people use for hunting rabbits and rats.
Harum-scarum: uncontrolled and not sensible.
Harvest: the activity of collecting a crop.
Shocking: something that is shocking makes you feel extremely surprised or upset.
Snow drift: a deep pile of snow made by the wind.
Straight-laced: morally very strict and old-fashioned.
Thresh: (verb) to separate the grain from the rest of a crop such as wheat using a tool or a machine.
Station: (verb) to send someone to a particular country or place in order to do a job, especially for the armed forces.
Waste ground: the land, gardens, and lawn that surround a large house or other building.
Weave: (verb) to construct by combining separate elements into a whole.

Pamela Lyne

(Laura Arjona)
Page 130
Chicken pox: an infectious disease that most children get once, in which the skin is covered with red spots. Chickenpox is a more serious disease in adults.

Joan Marriott

(Estefanía Román)
Pages 131 and 132
Alight /əˈlaɪt/ Get out of vehicle
Attached /əˈtætʃt/ Fond of, connected
Dreadful /ˈdredfʊl/ Very unpleasant
Help out: to assist during a time of need
Life-long friends /ˈlaɪflɒŋ/ Lasting or continuing through all or much of one's life
Prove /pru:v/ Demonstrate conclusively
Slide /slaɪd/ To (cause to) move in continuous contact with a smooth or slippery surface

Olive Martin

(Irene Garrido 5M330)
Pages 134 and 135
Chores: an ordinary job that must be done regularly
Come down (v): to travel to a place that is further south or is smaller or less important than the place you are leaving
Fretty: fretful, irritable, peevish
Morrison table shelter: Named after the Home Secretary, Herbert Morrison, the shelters were meade of very heavy steel and could be put in the living room and use as a table. One wire side lifted up for people to crawl underneath and get inside. Morrison shelters were fairly large and provided sleeping space for two or three people.
Reins: a set of bands fastened around a small child than an adultholds so that the child can walk alone but cannot run away

Marianne Mason

(Mónica Bandera)
Pages 137-137
Tanks - a large metal container for liquid or gas
Paddle -a short pole that you push into the water in order to move a small boat such as a canoe. It is wide and flat at one or both ends.
Tell off - to criticize someone angrily for doing something wrong
Smashing - very good, or impressive
Backet - a round open container with a handle, used for carrying liquid and substances such as sand or soil
Shed - to get rid of something that is not wanted or is no longer necessary
Cesspool - a large covered hole or container in the ground for collecting the liquid and solid waste that flows from a building
Hay - long grass that has been cut and dried, used for feeding animals
Stacks - a large pile of hay in a field, that has been built up and covered in order to store it
Cart - a vehicle with four wheels and no roof that is pulled by a horse and is used for carrying things
Knickers - a piece of underwear for a woman’s lower body. The American word is panties.
Harverst - the activity of collecting a crop
Stockings - a piece of clothing worn on a woman’s foot and leg, held up by suspenders
Plait - to twist three long lengths of hair, rope, wool etc over and under each other to make one single piece. The usual American word is braid

Ruby Maw

(Laura Arjona)
Page 137
Mistress: a woman school teacher
Overhear (verb) : to hear what people are saying during a conversation that you are not involved in
The height of sth: a high level of activity or success

Joyce Milan

(A. Manzano 5L730)
Pages 138-140
Attempted: /əˈtemptɪd/used about things that someone tries to do but does not succeed in doing, especially things that are wrong or illegal
Coarse: /kɔː(r)s/rough in texture, structure, etc.; not fine
Cocoa: /ˈkəʊkəʊ/a brown powder made from cocoa beans that is used for making chocolate or chocolate-flavoured foods and drinks
Cuff: /kʌf/the part of a sleeve that fits around your wrist
Doodlebug: /ˈduːd(ə)lˌbʌɡ/a flying bomb used by the Germans for attacking Britain in the Second World War
Issue: /ˈɪʃuː/to announce something, or to give something to people officially
Lukewarm: /ˌluːkˈwɔː(r)m/not hot or cold enough to be enjoyable
Overnight: /ˌəʊvə(r)ˈnaɪt/during the night, or from one evening until the next morning
Porridge: /ˈpɒrɪdʒ/a hot food made from oatmeal and milk or water, often eaten at breakfast
Scrape: /skreɪp/to rub a sharp edge or tool against a surface
Trotter: /ˈtrɒtə(r)/the foot of a pig, sometimes cooked and eaten as food
Joan Morgan
(Carmen González)
Pages 145-153.
Adder (noum): The common European viper.
Air raid (noum): An attack by hostile aircraft.
Aspidistra (noum): Any Asian plant of the liliaceous genus Aspidistra, esp A. lurida, a popular house plant with long tough evergreen leaves and purplish flowers borne on the ground.
Banner (noum): The flag of a country, army, troop, etc.; A piece of material, such as cloth, carried in processions.
Belly (noum): The abdomen of an animal.
Beret (noum): A soft, visorless cap with a close-fitting headband and a wide, round top often with a tab at its center.
Billet (verb): To provide a place to live and stay for; quarter.
Billet (noum): Lodging for a soldier, etc., as in a private home.
Blacksmith (noum): A person who makes objects from iron, esp. horseshoes.
Brook (noum): A small natural stream of fresh water.
Bundle (verb): To send or push away hurriedly.
Cardboard (noum): A thin stiff board made from paper pulp and used esp. for making cartons.
Cart (noum): a two-wheeled vehicle pulled by horses, oxen, etc., and used to carry goods, for farming, etc.
Chenille (noum): A fabric made with yarn that is thick and velvety, used esp. in bedspreads.
Cry out (ver): To scream or shout aloud, esp. in pain, terror, etc.
Currant (noum): A small seedless raisin used in cooking.
Custard (noum): A food, esp. a dessert, made with eggs, milk and usually sugar, baked or boileduntil thickened.
Dawdle (verb): To move or act too slowly.
Dressed to the nines (idiom): Dressed very well or splendidly, esp. in formal clothing.
Dough (noum): Flour combined with water, milk, etc. in a thick mass for baking.
Earthenware (noum): Pottery of baked or hardened clay, esp. any of the coarse, opaque varieties.
Empire Day (noum): The former name of Commonwealth Day (a holiday observed in some countries of the Commonwealth of Nations, originally on May 24, the anniversary of Queen Victoria’s birth, but now on varying dates).
Ferret (noum): A domesticated, usually red-eyed, and albinic variety of the polecat, used un Europe for driving rabbits and rats from their burrows.
Fluff (verb): To become fluffly; move, float, or settle down like fluff.
Forge (noum): A fireplace or furnace in which metal is heated before shaping.
Foul (adj.): Offensive to the senses; disgusting.
French Letter: The term used by soldiers in the European Theater during World War II for a condom.
Fringe (noum): A decorative border of short threads, cords or loops.
Genteel (adj.): Beloonging or suited to polite society.
German Measles (noum): A contagious disease in wich red spots appear on the body; rubella.
Glow worn (noum): Any of various other beetle larvae or wingless females that emit a glow rather than a flash of light.
Harvest (noum): The gathering of crops.
Hay (noum): Grass cut and dried for use as food for animals.
Hedge (noum): A row of bushes or small trees forming a fence or boundary.
Herd (verb): To unite or move in a herd.
Hoyden (noum): A boisterous, bold and carefree girl.
In two (idiom): Into two separates parts, as halves.
Jig (noum): A plate, box, or frame for holding work and guiding amachine tool to it.
Kennel (noum): A small house for a dog.
Kitten (noum): A young cat.
Lad (noum): A familiar or affectionate term of address for a man (informal).
Lardy (adj.): Fat or becoming fat.
Mane (noum): The long thick hair around or at the back of the neck of some animals, as the horse or lion.
Marquee (noum): A large tent or tentlike shelter with open sides, esp. one for temporary use in outdoor entertaiments, receptions, etc.
Martinet (noum): Someone who demands overly strict discipline, esp. a military person.
Milk (verb): To draw milk from the udder or breast of.
Nip (verb): To take off by pinching, biting, or snipping.
Parlour (noum): Also called locutorium. A room in a monastery or the like where the inhabitants may converse with visitors or with each other.
Plait (verb): To form a plait.
Plait (noum): A knot formed by twisting three or more lengths of rope, hair, etc. together.
Prowess (noum): Great or exceptional ability, skill, or strength.
Quarry (noum): An open hole or pit dug in the ground, from which building stone, slate, or the like, is obtained by cutting, blasting, etc.
Ribbon (noum): A band of fine material, used for ornament, tying, etc.
Round up (verb): To drive or bring (cattle, etc.) together.
Scatter (verb): To throw loosely about.
Scullery: A room off a kitchen where food is prepared and utensils cleaned and stored.
Scythe (noum): A tool that is a long, curving blade fastened at an angle to a handle, for cutting grass, grain, etc., by hand.
Sheaves (noum, plural) --> sheaf (noum, singular): A bundle into which cereal plants are tied up after being gathered from the fields.
Shed (noum): A small, roughly built structure made for shelter, storage, etc.
Soil (verb): To (cause to) become dirty.
Spindle (noum): A rounded rod, usually of wood, tapering toward each end, used in hand-spinning to twist into thread the fibers drawn from the mass on the distaff and on which the thread is wound as it is spun.
Stook (verb): To shock.
Stool (noum): A simple armless and usually backless seat on legs.
Stool ball (noum): A game resembling cricket, still played by girls and women in Sussex, England.
Supper (noum): The evening meal, often the principal meal of the day, esp. one taken in the evening.
Tease (verb): To irritate, bother, or anger (someone or an animal) with jokes, playful words or actions, or other annoyances.
Tick off (verb): To mark with a tick; check.
Tin (adj.): Made of tin or plated with tin.
Tin (noum): A low-melting metal element with a silvery color and luster.
Tin (noum): A sealed can containing food.
Tip (verb): To overturn, upset, or overthrow.
Tripe (noum): The first and second divisions of the stomach of certain animals, used as food.
Twig (verb): To understand.
Wave (verb): To signal, esp. in greeting, by raising the hand and moving the fingers.
Warehouse (noum): A building for the storage of goods or merchandise.
Whale (noum): Something great or fine of its kind.
Whilst (conj.): While.
Whip (noum): An instrument for striking, as un driving animals or in punishing, typically consisting of a lash or other flexible part with a more rigid hadle.

Alan Morgan

(Patricia Merino 5L730)
Page 144
Blackout:(noun) a period during a war when lights in streets and buildings are turned off so that an enemy cannot see them at night.
Bother: (verb) to make someone feel worried or upset.
Bran: (noun) the outside of the grain of a cereal such as wheat or oats.
Come over: (phrasal verb) a feeling comes over you, it suddenly affects you in a strong way.
Dish up: (phrasal verb) to put food into dishes so that it is ready to be eaten.
Field: (noun) an area of land used for keeping animals or growing food.
Fond: (adjective) liking and caring about someone very much, especially as a result of knowing them well or for a long time.
Juicy: (adjective) juicy food tastes good because it contains a lot of liquid.
Knickers: (noun) a piece of underwear for a woman’s lower body. The American word is panties.
Mud: (noun) very soft wet earth.
Pie: (noun) a food that consists of meat, vegetables, or fruit cooked inside a case of pastry or below a layer of it.
Pillowcase: (noun) a cloth cover for a pillow.
Raid: (noun) a sudden short military attack.
Run out: (phrasal verb) if something runs out, you do not have any more of it left.
Shelter: (noun) a place where people are protected from bad weather or from danger.
Wellie: (noun)a rubber or plastic boot that does not let water in.

Lil Murrell

(A. Manzano 5L730)
Pages 158-159
Acquire: /əˈkwaɪə(r)/to get something, for example by buying it or being given it
Afford: /əˈfɔː(r)d/if you can afford something, you have enough money to be able to pay for it. This word usually follows ‘can’, ‘could’, or ‘be able to’
Bib: /bɪb/a square part above the waist of some types of skirt or trousers that covers your chest
Blitz: /blɪts/a sudden military attack
Boost: /buːst/to help something to increase, improve, or become more successful
Brace: /breɪs/two long narrow pieces of cloth that go over a man’s shoulders and are fastened to the waist of his trousers at the front and back in order to hold them up. The American word is suspenders.
Can ill afford (to do) something: … /əˈfɔː(r)d/… Used for saying that someone should definitely not do something because it will cause problems
Combined: /kəmˈbaɪnd/done by people or groups working together
Declining: /dɪˈklaɪnɪŋ/becoming less or worse
Demise: /dɪˈmaɪz/the time when something stops existing
Dungarees: /ˌdʌŋɡəˈriːz/a piece of clothing consisting of trousers and a square piece of cloth that fits over your chest, held up by narrow pieces of cloth over your shoulders. The American word is overalls.
Ensuing: /ɪnˈsjuːɪŋ/an ensuing event or activity happens after something else, often as a result of it
Guvnor: /ˈɡʌv(ə)nə(r)/someone who is in charge of your work
Kiln: /kɪln/a type of oven used for baking clay, bricks etc to make them hard
Merger: /ˈmɜː(r)dʒə(r)/the process of combining two companies or organizations to form a bigger one
Nevertheless: /ˌnevə(r)ðəˈles/despite a fact or idea that you have just mentioned: used as a way of showing how a sentence, phrase, or word is related to what has already been said
Premises: /ˈpremɪsɪz/the buildings and land that a business or organization uses
Remain: /rɪˈmeɪn/to continue to be in a particular situation or condition
Shelter: /ˈʃeltə(r)/a place where people are protected from bad weather or from danger
Snood: /snud/a piece of clothing, usually worn around the neck or as a hood. A blend of 'scarf' and 'hood'.
Tram: /træm/a long narrow vehicle that travels along metal tracks in the middle of a street and is used as public transport in some plaWater mill: … /mɪl/ A building with a large wheel that is turned by water from a river to produce energy to make a machine work

Eileen Owen

Laura Jaramillo
(Pages 164-166)
A LENGHT OF TIME: a particular amount of time
ALLOCATE (v) to officially give something to someone, or to decide that something can be used for a specific purpose
BLACKOUT (n) a short period when the electricity supply to a building or district is stopped, especially at night
CONTEMPORARY (adj) alive or existing at the same time as a particular event or person
DAFFODIL (n) a tall yellow flower with a centre shaped like a cup that grows in spring
LEDGER (n) a book that contains the financial records of a business
MOOR n) a large area of high land covered with grass, bushes, and heather, with soil that is not good for growing crops
PIER (n) a structure built out from the land over water and used for getting on and off boats
SCATTERED (Adj) spread over a large area
STRAIGHTEN OUT (phrasal verb) to make something straight
TEARFUL (adj) crying, or feeling as if you want to cry
TRESTLE TABLE (n) a frame that is shaped like the letter ‘A’, used especially for supporting a board to make a temporary table called a trestle table
UPROOT (v) to leave the place where you live and go to live somewhere else, especially when you do not want to leave, or to make someone do this
Jane Pepper
(Ana Belén Del Pozo)
Pages: 169-170
Arrangement (noun): ] a way of organizing things so that problems are solved or avoided
Cling together: to stay very close to someone, usually because you want them to protect you
Entirely (adverb): completely, or in every way
Fitted (adj): built or made to fit a particular space Homesick
Homesick (adj): feeling sad and alone because you are far from home
Ill-fiting (adj): ill-fitting clothes are the wrong size for the person wearing them
Onwards (adverb): if something happens or exists from a particular time onwards, it starts at that time and continues to happen or exist
Plea (noun): an urgent or emotional request for something
Recall (verb): to remember something
Ribbon (noun): a long narrow piece of coloured cloth or paper, usually used as a decoration or to tie something
Scheme (noun): a system for organizing or arranging information
Slip (verb): if you slip, your feet slide accidentally and you lose yourbalance or fall over Unevenly (adj): not of the same quality in all its parts
Wartime (noun): the period when a war is taking place
Whooping (verb): to shout unexpectedly because you are very happy or excited about something
Yield (verb): to finally agree to do what someone else wants you to do

Margaret Phair

(Mónica González)
Pages 172 and 173
Burst at the seams: very full of people or things
Drive someone round the bend (v): to annoy someone very much
Frankincense: a substance that is burned to produce a nice smell in some religious ceremonies, a type of incense
Jumble: a collection of different things mixed together
Knick-knack: a small cheap object used as a decoration
Myrrh: a sticky brown substance with a sweet smell used for making perfume, incense and medicine
Nit: the egg of an insect called a louse that people sometimes have in their hair
Puppy dog: very young dog
Revolting: extremely unpleasant
Runny nose: nose with liquid coming out of it
Situation: (formal) a job
Spinster: an insulting word for a woman who is not married and is past the age when women usually get married
Toddler: a very young child who is learning how to walk

Joy Plant

(Patricia Merino 5L730)
Pages 174 - 178
Bachelor: (noun) a man who has never been married. It is more usual to say that someone who is not married is single.
Beaker: (noun) a plastic cup with straight sides used for drinking.
Billet: (noun) a place, usually someone’s house, that soldiers live in temporarily, especially during a war.
Blitz: (noun) aerial attack.
Break out: (phrasal verb) if something bad such as a war or disease breaks out, it starts.
Burn out: (phrasal verb) to completely destroy the inside of something such as a vehicle or building.
Camp bed: (noun) bed which you can use to sleep in the cam or outdoors.
Caustic: (adjective) expressing severe criticism of someone, often in a funny or clever way.
Corned beef: (noun) cooked beef that has been preserved in salt water.
Feverish: (adjective) affected by fever.
Foster: (verb) to look after a child as part of your family for a period of time because the child’s parents cannot look after them.
Knapsack: (noun) a bag that you carry on your back.
Knit: (verb) to make something such as a piece of clothing using wool and sticks called knitting needles.
Lavatory: (noun) a toilet.
Maiden: (noun) an old word meaning ‘a girl or young woman who is not married’.
Nuisance: (adjective) a person who causes some difficulty or trouble for someone else.
Onlooker: (noun) someone who watches something happens but does not take part in it.
Overflowing: (adjective) to flow over the top of a container because it is too full.
Parcel: (noun) something wrapped in paper or in a large envelope to be sent by post.
Pier: (noun) a structure built out from the land over water and used for getting on and off boats.
Preacher: (noun) someone whose job is to give religious speeches or to lead religious ceremonies in some Christian churches.
Pump: (noun) a piece of equipment for making a liquid or gas move into or out of something.
Raid: (noun) a sudden short military attack.
Ramble: (verb) to go for a long walk in the countryside for enjoyment.
Restless: (adjective) not willing or able to keep still because you are nervous, bored, or impatient.
Slice: (noun) a flat piece of food that has been cut from something larger.
Spread: (verb) to gradually affect or cover a larger area.
Stow: (verb) to put something somewhere while you are not using it.
Supper: (noun) the last main meal of the day, usually an informal meal that you eat at home.
Summon up: (phrasal verb) to manage to produce a quality or a reaction that helps you to deal with a difficult situation.
Tease: (verb) to say something to someone in order to have fun by embarrassing or annoying them slightly in either a friendly or an unkind way.
Tramp: (verb) a long tiring walk.
Widow: (noun) a woman whose husband has died and who has not married again.

Lilian Burnett

(Mónica Bandera)
Pages 38-40
the powers that be - the people who control a situation. This expression usually shows that you do not agree with their decisions.
Gas masks - a specialcovering for your face that protects you from poisonousgas
Toddler - a very young child who is learning how to walk
At stake – 1.likely to be lost or damaged if something fails 2. used about important issues that are involved in a situation or could be decided by it.
Air raid - A military or armed attack: air raid, air strike, attack...
Debris - the broken pieces that are left when something large has been destroyed, especially by an explosion, fire, or accident.
Disposable - something that is disposable is designed to be thrown away after you have used it once or a few times.
Waif and strays - children or animals that do not have homes
Ache - if part of your body aches, you feel a continuous pain there that is unpleasant, but not very strong
Welfare - care provided by the state or another organization for people in need.
Clack - to make a short loud sound like one hard object hitting against another
Rattle - if something rattles, it makes short sharp knocking sounds as it moves or shakes

Joan Pearce

(A.Manzano 5L730)
Pages 166-169
Badge: /bædʒ/ a small round object that fastens onto your clothes with a pin and usually has a picture or writing on it. The American word is button.
Blow up: /bləʊ/… If something blows up, or if someone blows something up, it explodes and is destroyed
Bucket: /ˈbʌkɪt/a round open container with a handle, used for carrying liquid and substances such as sand or soil
Coach: /kəʊtʃ/ a long comfortable vehicle for carrying a large number of passengers,
especially on long journeys
Conscription: /kənˈskrɪpʃ(ə)n/the process of making people join the armed forces
Dreaded: /ˈdredɪd/ OFTEN HUMOROUS frightening or worrying
Duration: /djʊˈreɪʃ(ə)n/ the period of time during which something continues to happen or exist
Gear: /ɡɪə(r)/ the special clothes and equipment that you use for aparticular activity
Heal: /hiːl/if an injury heals, the skin or bone grows back together and becomes healthy again
Hire: /ˈhaɪə(r)/if you hire something, such as a car, room, or piece of equipment, you pay the owner so that you can use it,especially for a short time. The usual American word is rent
Hostess: /ˈhəʊstɪs/ a woman who invites someone to a meal or party, or to stay for a short time in her home. A man who does this is called a host.
Keep in with someone: to stay friendly with someone, especially someone who can help you
Only child: a child who has no brothers or sisters
Outing: /ˈaʊtɪŋ/ a short journey that you take for enjoyment
Shovelful: /ˈʃʌv(ə)lfʊl/the amount of something that can fit on a shovel
Windmill: /ˈwɪn(d)ˌmɪl/a tall building with sails (=long pieces of wood or metal) that turn in the wind and produce power to crush grain or produce electricity
Wound: /wuːnd/an injury in which your skin or flesh is damaged, usually seriously

Dymphna Porter

(Belén Leiva)
Pages 179-190
awe (n.) - feeling of wonder
bestow (v.) - to give valuable property or an important right or honour to someone
bias (n.) - inclination for something
brick up (v.) - to fill a space in a wall with bricks
boost morale (v.) - to make someone feel more positive and confidence
bustle (v.) - to move somewhere quickly
catch-phrase (n.) - a short phrase that many people know because a famous person often says it
cavort (v.) - to play, dance or have fun with someone
clutch (v.) - to hold sth/sb firmly
cove (n.) - a small area of sea that is partly surrounded by land
crisply (adv.) - cleanly, neatly
disdainfully (adv.) - not showing respect
doodlebug (n.) - WWII flying bomb
halt (n.) - stop
headmistress (n.) - female head teacher of a school
herd (v.) - to move people like animals on farm
hide and seek (n.) - a children’s game in which one player lets the other players hide, and then tries to find them
indoctrination (n.) - teaching a set of beliefs so thoroughly that they do not accept any other ideas
influx (n.) - a large number of people or things coming to a particular place
ludo (n.) - a traditional board game
mock (n.) - not real but intended to look or seem real
motley (adj.) - consisting of many different types of people or things that do not seem to belong together
parlourmaid (n.) - a woman servant in a large house in the past whose job included serving meals
plot (v.) - to conspire
shatter (v.) - to break in pieces
smear (v.) - to try to damage someone´s reputation by telling lies about them
starched (adj.) - a fabric made stiff with starch
stounch (adj.) - loyal
stretch (v.) - to make someone use all their intelligence or ability, especially in a way that is interesting or enjoyable
strip (v.) - to remove paint from sth.
throng (v.) - crowd together
trudge (v.) - to walk somewhere with slow heavy steps
unashamedly (adv.) - not ashamed or embarrassed
unruly (adj.) - very difficult to control
wear off (v.) - when a pain, a feeling or an emotion that gradually disappears

Lorna Pyke

(Lorenzo Hernandez)
Pages 192 and 193
rambling: Having many haphazard extensions
Humpback: Arched bridge
Slunk: Move furtively
Cuddled: Hug tenderly
Trespassing: To go into a place without the owner’s permission

Ethel Robinson

(Laura Arjona)
Pages 194 and 195
Get cracking (verb): to start doing something or going somewhere immediately
Kerfuffle: a lot of talk, activity, or worry about something that is not important
lull: a quiet period during a very active or violent situation
make a fuss (verb): to give a person or animal a lot of attention to show that you love them
not care tuppence: to not care at all
play truant (verb): to stay away from school without permission
Up hill and down dale: move all over an area

Sheila Shear

(Loly Reyes Molina)
(pag 201-204)
Awe: a feeling of great respect and admiration, often combined with fear.
Bachelor: a man who has never been married.
Bequest: money or property that you give to someone after you die by making a legal document called a will.
Blitz: (shortened from German Blitzkrieg, "lightning war") was the period of strategic bombing of the United Kingdom by Nazi Germany during the Second World War.
Crock: a round container for storing food, usually made of clay.
Customary: usual in a particular society or situation.
Cutlery: the knives, forks, and spoons that you use for eating food. The usual American word is silverware.
Devastated: feeling very shocked and upset.
Dumpling: a small solid lump of cooked food made from flour and water, sometimes eaten with meat or added to soup.
Escort: (verb) a person or a group of people, vehicles, ships etc that go somewhere with another person, vehicle, ship etc in order to protect them or to prevent them from escaping.
Eulogy: a speech at a funeral about the person who has died.
Fast: (verb) to eat no food or very little food for a period of time, often for religious reasons.
Feeble: not good enough to achieve the intended result.
Fete: BRITISH an outdoor event with goods for sale and competitions, usually organized by a school or church to make money.
Gentile: someone who is not Jewish.
Grief: a strong feeling of sadness, usually because someone has died.
Hamper: a large basket or wicker container, usually with a cover.
ITMA: It's That Man Again (or, commonly, ITMA) was a BBC radio comedy programme which ran from 1939 to 1949. The title refers to a contemporary phrase concerning the ever more frequent news-stories about Hitler in the lead-up to World War II
Jog: (verb) to knock something so that it moves slightly.
Lather: the white mass of bubbles produced when you mix soap and water.
Mantle: a glass cover that you put over a flame to make a brightlight.
Matzo: a type of flat bread traditionally eaten by Jewish people during the Passover holiday.
Passover: a religious festival lasting seven or eight days in March or April during which Jews remember the time when the ancient Hebrews escaped from Egypt. Passover begins with a special meal.
Plush: made from or covered with a soft thick cloth similar to velvet.
Run over: (verb) to hit someone or something with a vehicle and drive over them.
Spam: a canned food product consisting esp. of pork formed into a solid block.
Strop: a piece of leather used for keeping the blade of a razor sharp.
Trepidation: fear, or nervousness.
Scullery: a room next to the kitchen that some old houses have, used for washing dishes or clothes.
Thrill: to make someone feel very excited and pleased.
Throng: a large crowd of people.
Token: something that you do for someone or that you give them as a way of showing your feelings towards them.
Top up: to add more to something in order to increase it to the level that you want or need.
Trying: difficult to deal with in a way that makes you annoyed or tired.
Upholster: to cover a chair or sofa with cloth or leather so that it is attractive and comfortable.
Uproot: to leave the place where you live and go to live somewhere else, especially when you do not want to leave, or to make someone do this.
Yom Kippur: a day each year in September or October when Jewish people do not eat or drink but pray to God to forgive them for things that they have done wrong. This holiday is also called the Day of Atonement

Eric Sidmore

(Chary Manzorro)
Billet: V. provide lodging for a soldier.
Chore: N. tedious tasks.
Hay: N. grass that is ​ cut and ​ dried and used as ​animal ​food.
Feuds: N. an argument that has existed for a long time between two people or groups, causing a lot of anger or violence.
Misdeeds: N. an act that is criminal or bad.
Ladle: N. a very ​ big ​ spoon with a ​ long ​ handle and a ​ deep cup-shaped ​part, used ​especially for ​serving ​ soup.
Lateness: N. the ​ fact of being late.
Loaf: N. ​ bread that is ​ shaped and ​ baked in a ​ single ​ piece and can be ​sliced for ​eating.
Raid: N. a short sudden attack, usually by a small group of people.
Sugar beet: N. a ​ plant with a ​ thick ​ root, often ​ fed to ​ animals or used to make ​sugar.
Tiresome: ​ annoying and making you ​lose ​patience.
Wear off: V. disappeared.
Wintry: Adj. cold and typical of winter.

Ena Smith

(Chary Manzorro)
Air-raid: N underground bunker.
Arnica: N. tincture; botany; plant.
Bump: N a round, ​ raised ​ area on a ​ surface or on the ​body.
Co-op: N short form of​ cooperative.
Chink: N. a ​small ​narrow ​crack or ​opening.
Pantry: N. a ​ small ​ room or ​ large ​ cupboard in a ​ house where ​ food is ​ kept.
Pram: N. baby carriage.
Terraced: Adj. ​ built as or ​ belonging to a ​row of often ​small ​houses ​joined together along ​their ​side ​ walls
Dreadful: adj. very unpleasant.
Mouse-ridden: Adj. an ​ area where there is a lot of ​mouses.
Ramshackle: ​Adj. badly or ​ untidily made and ​likely to ​break or ​fall down ​easily.
Splutter: V. if something such as an engine splutters, it makes a series of short noises because it is not working well.
Squash: V to ​ push yourself, a ​person, or thing into a ​small ​space.
Tub: N container that is ​ filled with ​ water so that you can ​sit or ​lie in it to ​wash ​your ​whole ​body.
Warden: N. UK theheadof acollege.

Peter Smith

(Mónica Bandera)
Pages 214-215
Kite - a toy that flies in the air while you hold it by a long string
Ramshackle - in bad condition and likely to fall down
Aircraft - a plane, helicopter, or other vehicle that flies
Humdinger - an exciting or excellent example of something
Gathering - a group of people meeting together
Crates - a container that is divided into smaller individual sections and used for moving bottles

Renee Silverman

(Carmen González)
Pages 205-207.
Aviary (noum): A large cage (= area surrounded by wire or bars) or closed space in which birds are kept as pets.
Be "four-by-two": To be a Jew,
Budgerigar (noum): An Australian parakeet, having greenish plumage with black and yellow markings, bred as a pet in a variety of colors (bird).
Doodlebug (noum): A British colloquial name for the V-1 flying bomb (aircraft).
Flatlet (noum): A residential apartment with only one or two rooms.
Inwards: Toward the inside, interior, or center, as of a place, space or body.
Lean (verb): To bend or tilt (the body) form a vertical position.
Muddle (noum): a confused or disordered state of affairs.
Raid (noum): A sudden assault, attack, or other act of entering.
Scripture (noum): The holy writings of a religion.
Shatter (verb): To (cause something to) break suddenly into very small pieces.
Smack (verb): To hit someone or something forcefully with the flat inside part of your hand, producing a short, loud noise, especially as a way of punishing a child.
Smashing (adj.): Impressive or wonderful.
Spiteful (adj.): Disapproving.
String (noum): Strong, thin rope made by twisting very thin threads together, used for fastening and tying things.
Tell off (verb): To separate from the whole and assign to a particular duty.
Trestle (noum): A supporting structure for a table, consisting of a flat piece of wood supported at each end by two pairs of sloping legs.
Testle table (noum): A table that consists of a board supported by a trestle.
Milly Squibb
(Chary Manzorro)
Billeting office: It was an office where got evacuee(s) then went round the houses asking the home owners to take in an evacuee(s) and if they wanted a boy or girl (if they accepted).
Blast: V. to explode or ​ destroy something or someone with ​explosives, or to ​break through or ​hit something with a ​ similar, very ​ strong ​ force.
Cobweb: N. a ​ structure like a ​net of ​sticky ​silk ​threads made by a ​spider for ​catching ​insects.
Cockle: N. a ​ small, ​ rounded ​ sea ​ creature with a ​shell, ​common in ​Europe. Cockles can be ​cooked and ​eaten.
Fetch: V. to go to another ​ place to get something or someone and ​bring it, him, or her back.
Hop: N. the dried ​ fruits of a ​climbing ​plant, used to give a ​bitter ​ flavour to ​beer.
Mildew: N a ​ black, ​ green, or ​ whitish ​ area ​ caused by a ​ fungus that ​ grows on things such as ​plants, ​ paper, ​ cloth, or ​ buildings, usually if the ​conditions are ​warm and ​wet.
Mildewed: Adj. rotten
Penn’orth (pennyworth): N. as much of something as could be ​bought for a ​penny.
Whist: N. a ​card ​game ​played between two ​pairs of ​players in which each ​side ​tries to ​win more ​cards than the other.
Deirdre Wynne-Harley
(Lorenzo Hernandez)
Pages 250 and 254
Gulped down: To swallow eagerly
Dwindled: To become smaller
Haversacks: A bag with a single strap for wearing over one shoulder
Commodity: Something that can be bought and sold, especially a basic food productor fuel
Rainwater butt: A very large container with curved sides that is used for collecting or storing liquids
Privy: knowing about something, usually official information, that other people do not know
Flush WC: To clean something by pouring a lot of water over it or through it
Kitchen range: A very large old-fashioned piece of kitchen equipment with several ovens heated by a fire
Starched sheets: starched clothes have been made stiff with starch
Cockerels: A young cock (=male chicken
Warts: A small hard lump that grows on your skin, for example on your neck or hand, and is caused by a virus
Taunt: To shout cruel things at someone in order to make them angry or upset
The local “gentry”: An old word for people from a high social class
Riding breeches: Old-fashioned trousers that end at the knee

Shirley Pug

(Lorenzo Hernandez)
Pages 191
Myfanwy: A woman’s name derived from annoy ´beloved´
Vale of Clwyd in North Wales:Is a tract of low-lying ground in the county of Denbighshire in northeast Wales
Shelter: Protection against wind, rain, enemies etc

Stanley Miller

(Mónica Bandera)
Pages 140-141
Shortages - a lack of something that you need or want
Cunning - someone who is cunning uses their intelligence to get what they want, especially by tricking or cheating people
Readily – easily
Dried - dried substances such as food, milk, or flowers have had the water removed from them
Misdemeanor - an action that is bad or wrong, but not in a serious way
Shattered - extremely upset
Moulding - something that was produced in a mould
Masonry - the bricks or stones that make a building, wall, or other structure

Irene Swanton

(Estefanía Román)
Pages 219 and 220
Adjoing /əˈdʒɔɪn/ To be close to or in contact (with)
Bully /ˈbʊlɪ/ Intimidate;domineer
Dodge /dɒdʒ/ Avoid
Duck /dʌk/ To avoid, or try to escape from
Eagerly /ˈiːgəlɪ/ With enthusiasm
Harshness /ˈhɑːʃnɪs/ Abrasiveness, cruelty, hardness, roughness
Longing /ˈlɒŋɪŋ/ Strong, lasting desire, esp. for something hard to reach or distant
Rattle /ˈrætl/ To (cause to) make a rapid series of short, sharp sounds
Ruthless /ˈruːθlɪs/ Without pity or compassion
Shelter /ˈʃeltəʳ/ The protection or safety given by such a thing
Spurt /spɝt/ To show a sudden brief increase in activity, speed, etc
Tinged /tɪndʒ/ To give a slight degree of color to
Toddler /ˈtɒdləʳ/A child who has just started to walk but may be unsteady on his or her feet

Pat Taylor

(Verónica Ruiz)
Pages 221- 225
Alight: burning.
Assemble: to bring a group of things or people together in one place for a particular purpose.
Assortment: a group or set of things of various types.
Aviary: an enclosed area where birds are kept.
Bedstead: the wooden or metal frame of a bed.
Bucket: a round open container with a handle, used for carrying liquid and substances such as sand or soil.
Bun: a small round piece of bread.
Chink: a very small space in a wall or between two things, especially when this lets light through.
Clutter: to put too many things in a place so that it looks untidy.
Cordite: a chemical that can explode, used in weapons.
Corduroy: a thick cotton cloth with a ridged surface (=one covered with raised lines). It is used especially for making jackets or trousers.
Crate: a large wooden box used for moving or storing goods.
Dogfight: a fight between military aircraft.
Doughnut: a round sweet food, often in the shape of a ring, that is made by cooking dough in oil.
Dreadful: very unpleasant.
Elm: a large tree with round leaves that fall off in winter.
Endeavour: an effort to do something, especially something new or difficult.
Exceedingly: extremely.
Fierce: very angry, or ready to attack.
Flimsy: light and not providing very much protection.
Fringe: short hair that hangs down over your forehead.
German measles: an infectious disease that causes red spots on the skin. German measles is a minor illness in children and adults, but can cause serious physical damage to babies before they are born. A more technical name for this is rubella.
Haversack: a large bag that you carry on your back or over one shoulder, for example when you go walking or camping.
Headmistress: a female teacher who is in charge of a school. A more usual word is headteacher. The usual American word is principal..
Hut: a small simple shelter.
Jug: a container from which you pour liquids such as water or milk.
Lane: a narrow road, especially in the countryside.
Latch: to fasten a door, gate etc with a latch.
Magpie: a noisy black and white bird with a long tail.
Needle: a small thin metal tool that is used for sewing. It has a sharp point at one end and a hole at the other.
Pickle: a cucumber or other vegetable preserved in vinegar or salt water.
Pond: an area of water similar to a lake but smaller, especially one that has been built artificially.
Scullery: a room next to the kitchen that some old houses have, used for washing dishes or clothes.
Seaman: a man who is a sailor, especially one who is not an officer.
Shelter: a temporary place to live for people who do not have their own homes, or for animals who have been treated in a cruel way.
Shrapnel: small pieces of metal that fly out of a bomb or bullet when it explodes.
Stew: a dish made by cooking vegetables, and usually meat or fish, slowly in liquid.
String: thin rope, usually made of twisted fibres and used for tying things together.
Walnut: a tree that produces nuts and wood.
Warden: someone whose job is to be responsible for a particular place or thing, and who checks that rules are obeyed.
Washday: the day of the week when you regularly wash your clothes.
Washstand: a tall table with a bowl for water used in the past for washing your face hands.
Wax: a soft natural or artificial substance that becomes liquid when heated, used for making candles and models, for making wooden furniture shine, and for protecting objects from water.
Wizened: old and with a lot of wrinkles (=lines) on the skin.
Yard: an enclosed area around a large building where people can do activities outside.

Anita Truman

(Chary Manzorro)
Beckon: V. to ​ move ​ your ​ hand or ​ head in a way that ​tells someone to come ​nearer.
Blackshirts: A quasi-military style organization with political uniforms. It was banned by the government.
Blitz :N. a ​ fast, ​ violent ​ attack on a ​ town, ​ city, etc., usually with ​bombs ​dropped from ​aircraft.
Bout: N. a ​ short ​ period of ​ illness or ​ involvement in an ​activity.
Canvas: N. ​ strong, ​ rough ​ cloth used for making ​tents, ​sails, ​bags, ​strong ​clothes, etc.
Conker: N. the ​ shiny ​ brown ​ poisonous ​ nut of a ​ horse ​ chestnut ​ tree.
Haversack: N. a ​ bag, often made from ​strong, ​rough ​cloth, with one or two ​shoulder ​straps.
Horn: N. a hard, ​ pointed, often ​curved ​part that ​grows from the ​top of the ​head of some ​animals, or the hard ​ substance of which a horn is made.
Snippet: N. a ​ small and often ​interesting ​piece of ​news, ​information, or ​conversation.
Taunt: V. to ​ intentionally ​ annoy and ​ upset someone by making ​unkind ​remarks to them, ​laughing ​ unkindly, etc.
Tenner: N. ten ​ pounds, or a ​ note ​ worth ten ​ pounds.
Wireless: N. a radio.

Olive Tuck

(Laura Arjona)
Pages 236 and 237
A blur of: something such as a thought or memory that is not very clear in your mind
Apron : something that you wear to protect the front of your clothes, especially when you are cooking
C of E : church of England
Carve out (verb): to develop a career or position for yourself by working hard
Child-minder: someone whose job is to look after children while their parents are at work, usually in his or her own home
Children’s hour: In the United Kingdom, Children's Hour was broadcast from 5 pm to 6 pm every day of the week, with the biggest listening figures being at weekends when parents joined in too. It was the time of day during the week when children could be expected to be home from school, and was aimed at an audience aged about 5 to 15 years.
Clutch (verb): to hold someone or something firmly, for example because you are afraid or in pain, or do not want to lose them
Cow manure: solid waste from farm animals, often mixed with other substances and used on crops to help them to grow
Cuddle (verb): if you cuddle someone, you put your arms round them and hold them close to show that you like or love them
Drum sth into someone: to make someone learn or understand something by repeating it many times
Gouache: a painting made with paints mixed with water and a type of glue
Hardship: a situation in which life is very difficult, usually because you do not have enough money
Lardy cake, also known as lardy bread, lardy Johns, dough cake and fourses cake is a traditional rich spiced form of bread found in several southern counties of England
Mickey mouse annual: The first Mickey Mouse Annual, published by London's Dean & Son Ltd, is of great significance in the history of Disney publications. Published possibly around Christmas of 1930, it is the first-ever Disney book published for retail, a Mickey Mouse Book which had come earlier in the same year in the US having been printed as a give-away for promotion purposes. Furthermore, this MMA marks the first-ever appearance of Disney comics produced for publication other than newspaper syndication.
Pike: a fish that lives in rivers and lakes and eats other fish
Publican: someone who owns or manages a pub
Reefer coat: a coat made of thick dark-blue wool, worn especially by sailors
Reluctantly: under protest, under threat, against your will
roaring fire: a roaring fire burns very brightly and produces a lot of heat
Rule sth with a rod of iron to control someone or something in a very strict way
Sling (verb): to throw something somewhere with force or in a careless way
Smack (verb): to hit someone with your flat hand or a flat object
Tweeds : a suit made from tweed (a type of thick rough cloth made from wool of different colours.
Stockings: a piece of clothing worn on a woman’s foot and leg, held up by suspenders.

Marjorie Walker

(Lorenzo Hernandez)
Pages 238 and 239
Utterly: Completely
Naughty: Disobedient
Scraps: To not ​continue with a ​system or ​plan
Utterly: Completely or totally

Michael Ward

(Lorenzo Hernandez)
Pages 240
To put paid to something: to put an end to something
Sinking: To settle or fall graduallyDrizzle: A very light rain
Varnish:A usually clear sticky liquid which gives protection and a glossysurface to wood, paint etc
Morgan’s Pomade: Morgan’s Pomade from England is branded as “The world’s most famous hair darkening pomade
Drizzle: To rain in small drops.
Needles and the Solent: The Needles on the Isle of Wight is surely one of the most photographed groups of rocks in the world. This row of three distinctive Chalk stacks features in all the classic views of the island, a truly unforgettable image

Maureen Weller

(Verónica Ruiz)
Pages 241 and 242
Allocate: to officially give something to someone, or to decide that something can be used for a specific purpose.
Anguish: a feeling of great physical or emotional pain.
Agreeable: pleasant, nice, or satisfactory
Apprehension: a feeling of worry or fear that something bad might happen.
Blurred: difficult to see clearly, or causing difficulty in seeing something clearly.
Boarding school: a school in which most or all of the students live during the part of the year that they go to lessons.
Break out: if something bad such as a war or disease breaks out, it starts.
Chamber pot: a round container kept in a bedroom in the past and used as a toilet during the night.
Chapel: a small church, or a special room used as a church, where Christians can pray or worship.
Congenial: a congenial situation is pleasant, friendly, and enjoyable.
Dawn: the beginning of the day, when it begins to get light.
Foster parents: A child who is looked after in someone else’s home for a period of time is called a foster child, and the people who look after the child are called foster parents.
Hastily: done in a hurry because you do not have much time.
Heathen: an insulting word for someone who is not a Christian or a follower of another major established religion.
Hindsight: the opportunity to judge or understand past events using knowledge that you have gained since then.
Isolation: the state of being separated from other people, or a situation in which you do not have the support of other people.
Obstinacy: the quality of being unwilling to be reasonable and change your behaviour, plans, or ideas.
Parlour: a room in a house, used for entertaining guests.
Put up: to let someone stay in your house.
Reluctant: not willing to do something.

Eileen Wells

(Loly Reyes Molina)
Pag: 242-245.
A lump in your throat: the feeling you get in your throat when you are going to cry.
Bare: bare walls, surfaces etc have no covering or decoration.
Buzz about: (verb) if a place or group of people is buzzing, there is a lot of noise or activity.
Carve: (verb) to make an object by cutting it from stone or wood.
Conservatory: a room with glass walls and a glass roof, built next to a house and used for relaxing in or for growing plants.
Creak: (verb) if something creaks, especially something wooden, it makes a high noise when it moves or when you put weight on it.
Dye: a substance used for changing the colour of something such as clothing or your hair.
Farewell: used for saying goodbye to someone when you do not expect to see them again for a long time.
Fender: a low frame round a fireplace that is designed to prevent burning coal or wood from falling out.
Floorboard: a long wooden board that is part of a wooden floor.
Foster: (verb) relating to fostering a child. A child who is looked after in someone else’s home for a period of time is called a foster child, and the people who look after the child are called foster parents.
Frightful: extremely serious or unpleasant.
Frock: (old-fashioned) a dress.
Fuss: a lot of unnecessary worry or excitement about something.
Glimpse of: an occasion when you see someone or something for a moment only.
Last straw: the last of a series of events that causes an angry or violent reaction.
Lullaby: a relaxing song that helps a young child go to sleep.
Mauve: pale purple in colour.
Nice as pie: behaving in a very pleasant way towards someone, especially when this was not expected.
Parade around: (showing disapproval) to walk around so that people will look at you and admire you.
Peep out: (verb) to appear slightly from behind or under something.
Polished: clean and shiny because of being rubbed, usually with a chemical substance.
Posh: something that is posh looks expensive and attractive.
Range: a very large old-fashioned piece of kitchen equipment with several ovens heated by a fire.
Recall: (verb) to make you feel or experience something that you have felt or experienced in the past.
Rocking chair: a chair that has two curved pieces under it, so that when someone sits on it they can move it backwards and forwards.
Schoolmistress: a woman who teaches in a school.
Scoop: (verb) to dig something out or pick it up using something such as a spoon or your curved hand.
Section off: to separate something into different parts or areas.
Snotty: a snotty person thinks they are better or more important than other people.
Spinster: an insulting word for a woman who is not married and is past the age when women usually get married.
Stare at: (verb) to look at someone or something very directly for a long time.
Straw: the yellow stems of dried crops such as wheat.
Streaks: a line or long mark on something that is a different colour from the colour surrounding it.
Tearful: crying, or feeling as if you want to cry.
Washstand: a tall table with a bowl for water used in the past for washing your face or hands.

Eileen Woods

(Estefanía Román)
Pages from 246 to 249
Acquired /əˈkwaɪəd/ To get possession of, or gain through one's efforts
Advent /ˈædvənt/ Arrival
Billet /ˈbɪlɪt/Lodging for a soldier
Chicken pox: Varicella
Crown /kraʊn/ Championship title
Demob /ˈdiːˈmɒb/ Abbreviation of demobilize
Duly /ˈdjuːlɪ/ In a due manner
Meantime /ˈmiːnˈtaɪm/ At the same time
Medical chart: Is used somewhat interchangeably to describe the systematic documentation of a single patient’s medical story and care across time within one particular health care provider's jurisdiction.
Mining /ˈmaɪnɪŋ/ Industry
Parnisp /ˈpɑːsnɪp/ Plant: root vegetable
Plasticine /ˈplæstɪsiːn/ Children's modelling material
Rag doll: Child's stuffed cloth doll
Raid /reɪd/ Sudden atack
Riot /ˈraɪət/ Violent public disorder
Shrapnel /ˈʃræpnl/ Fragments of exploded shell
Sick bay: A hospital or place where medical aid is given, esp. aboard a ship
Stick /stɪk/ Thrust [sth] in
Trace /treɪs/ Find origin of sth
Wicked /ˈwɪkɪd/ Mean, evil
Wreath: Funeral garland.