By Angeles Manzano





A. What memories of school do the evacuees have?


Some children enjoyed the bus ride to school.

external image ww2_children_evac_kentish_town.jpg
Source:bbc.co.uk

Other ones have memories about what insufficient were the desks and chairs and also how several classes were held at the same time.

---- For more information, visit: http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/world_war2/


"I first encountered proper evacuees at Loughor School, and their presence put me in a very complicated position", a child said. "This facility meant only that I ended up in a minority of one", he continued saying.


Sometimes the children thought they were going on a day's outing when they were evacuated.

external image img603.jpg
Source: www.mybrightonandhove.org.uk

Other children took the evacuation as a game and they even asked if they could use a label and go on the train to school. That's what Shirley Pugh seemed to want.

Nits could be picked up at school. In those days the treatment was washing the hair with vinegar and plastering it with Morgan’s Pomade.
Morgan pomade.png
Source: google

The children weren't always unhappy at local schools. Eileen enjoyed her school days in the lovely little village school. She won a prize in a competition organised by the local education authority. She made a warship out of grey plasticine and it was good. Her prize was half a crown of National Savings stamp.
external image stock-vector-vector-illustration-of-plasticine-ship-283306565.jpg

B. Where did they have classes?


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Source: pinterest.com

Sometimes the children had classes at the assembly hall.

Other times they had to travel long distances to go to school. This is the case of Joan Marriot, who travelled eveyday from Hailsham to Bexhill and attended Roan School.

Bexhill-Roan School.png Her dally trip to school.
Joan Marriot's experience.

Source: google maps.

The evacuee children often went to new schools that were situated at a very long distance from the original ones. This is the case Joan Pearce, who went from Charlton's school to Cranbrook's School during the Second World War.

Joan Pearce school.png

Source: google maps.


Also, Renne Silverman tells how classes took place in a church hall with many trestle tables.

external image contemporary-dining-tables.jpg
Source: www.houzz.com

Some children had to walk two or three miles from the farms to the school and they arrived tired and with blistered* feet.

*blistered: A local swelling of the skin that contains watery fluid and is caused by burning or irritation.



external image banishingblisters200x200_0.gif?itok=ull0YRbh

Source: http://www.runnersworld.com

C. How were the classes organised?


Sometimes each table was considered a different class with its own teacher.

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Source: www.tripadvisor.com.pe
The village children fought with the evacuees, so it was decided that they would have half day schooling, alternating morning and afternoon, so that the building could be shared peacefully. "Our half days off were spent roaming the countryside",said Deirdre Wynne-Harley.

Other times the classes started one week in the morning and another week in the afternoon and when they had free time the children used to go for walks on the beach, over the downs, and swim.

Some children were victims of discrimination for religious reasons. For instance, a little Jewish girl was not allowed to attend the scripture lessons at Luton's school. Instead, she had to wait outside the door sitting on the floor.


D. Memories of teachers who were evacuated with their schools.


The first stage of the process began on 1 September 1939 and involved teachers, local authority officials, railway staff, and 17,000 members of the Women's Voluntary Service (WVS), as Margaret Phair remembers in her memories.


Gladys Thomas'story is especially significant. She was a teacher who was evacuated with her colleagues and school children from Greenwich to Hastings at the end of the summer of 1939.

Gladys3.png
Source: google maps

In the summer of 1939 she was teaching at Calvert Road Junior mixed school in Greenwich. Until then, despite having been sent packets of gas masks and railway tickets, the only idea of a new war sounded ridiculous to her.

Gladys1.png
Source: google

But, at the end of the summer, all of the teachers were called to be at the school, where all of the children were waiting with their lunchboxes and identification labels.
The children were grouped and assigned to a teacher and a voluntary helper and then children and teachers took the LCC trams. On the streets, a chain of police women were clasping their hands and making a barrier that prevented mums and dads from running after their children.
The trams carried all of them to the railway station, where they took the train to Hastings, on the South of the U.K.


external image hastings-ciudad-695x245.jpg
Source: www.quieroirainglaterra.com

Gladys4bis.png


E. How did evacuation affect the children's education?


The children from the village were far behind and a girl wondered how she would catch up when she returned home.

Often, there was no register, so children as Renee Silverman spent many days reading in the park instead of going to school.

Most of them couldn't go to school as they should, and even if they did, it was in bad condition, without the necessary school material and often under the threat of the bombs.

On some occasions they had to interrupt the class and run to the shelter to avoid the blitz, so their education couldn't be completed and became clearly insufficient.

shelter.png

For further information, visit: http://www.1900s.org.uk/1940s-bomb-shelters-morrison.htm

F. Testimonies

David Jacobs
He was sent to the local school in a nearby village. He enjoyed the bus ride to school every morning. He was very popular with the mistresses and the girls, not so much with the boys.
An Anonymous Contribution
Information about school life: insufficient desks and chairs, several classes held at the same time at the assembly hall, the children from the village were far behind and she wondered how she would catch up when she returned home.
Dave Gelly
It was at Loughor that he first went to school. "I first encountered proper evacuees at Loughor School, and their presence put me in a very complicated position" he said. He could revert in an instant to broadest London. However, far from turning me into some kind of valued go-between or interpreter, this facility meant only that I ended up in a minority of one
Joan Marriott
In September 1939 she was one of the thousands of evacuees who set off from Surrey Docks Station for the country
She therefore went away with her school in Rotherhithe.
After being housed twice and not being able to settle, she finished up in the house of Edna and Charlie Hayler in Hailsham. She estayed with them from September 1.939 until June 1.940, travelling each day to Bexhill and attending the Roan School.
Joan Pearce
Joan was 9 years old.
She went to Maryon Park School in Charlton and she was evacuated with the school to Cranbrook.
She thought it was on a day's outing.
Margaret Phair
She was twelve when she was evacuated in September 1939 with her school for the first time.
After escaping from a bomb, she was evacuated again, this time to Ely.
The first stage of the process began on 1 September 1939 and involved teachers, local authority officials, railway staff, and 17,000 members of the Women's Voluntary Service (WVS).
Renee Silverman
The evacuees were given an empty school building, so they recognised everybody and they even had their own teachers.
They returned to their school in London, which had been prepared in case the bombs started
Later Renee and her brother moved to Luton. The school was a church hall with many trestle tables. Each table was a different class with its own teacher. There was no register, so Renee spent plenty of days reading in the park instead of going to school.
Her little sister, who was five, was not allowed to attend the scripture lessons at Luton's school because she was a Jew. Even though she wanted to hear about it, she had to wait outside the door sitting on the floor.
Gladys Thomas
She was a teacher and, at the end of the summer of 1939 she was evacuated from Greenwich, with her colleagues and school children, to Hasting.
In the summer of 1939 she was teaching at Calvert Road Junior mixed school in Greenwich. Until then, despite having been sent packets of gas masks and railway tickets, the only idea of a new war sounded ridiculous to her.
But, at the end of the summer, all of the teachers were called to be at the school, where all of the children were waiting with their lunchboxes and identification labels.
The children were grouped and assigned to a teacher and a voluntary helper and then children and teachers took the LCC trams. On the streets, a chain of police women were clasping their hands and making a barrier that prevented mums and dads from running after their children.
The trams carried all of them to the railway station, where they took the train to Hastings, on the South of the U.K.
The classes started for the children, one week in the morning and another week in the afternoon and when they had free time they used to go for walks on the beach, over the downs, and swim.
Marjorie Walker
She was nine when war broke out. She was evacuated to Lancashire with her two sisters.
When she returned to London, she did go back to school, but the sirens kept going and we had to keep going down to the shelter.
Michael Ward
She went to Hampshire to stay with her grandparents.
She picked up nits on the train or perhaps at school.
The treatment was washing with vinegar and plastering with Morgan’s Pomade.
Eileen Woods
Eileen was four years old when the war started. Her sister was fourteen and her brother was eight. Both were evacuated with their schools, Joan to Highbroons and Bernard to Hawkhurst in Kent. Eileen's mother and she were taken to Maidstone.
Eileen enjoyed her school days in the lovely little village school. She won a prize in a competition organised by the local education aithority. She made a warship out of grey plasticine and it was good. her prize was a half crown National Savings stamp.
Deirdre Wynne-Harley
"School for us that day was in the village hall; on the way down the street everyone was looking at us, exclaiming at the unhealthy pallor of all these ¨little vaccies¨, telling Auntie that what I needed was good Cornish food."
“When our small school in exile was assembled, we had a full age range form five to fourteen and one teacher.” Some children had to walk two or three miles from the farms and they arrived tired and with blistered feet. The village children fought with the evacuees, so it was decided that they would have half day schooling, alternating morning and afternoon, so that the building could be shared peacefully. “Our half days off were spent roaming the countryside."

G. Sources

www.bbc.co.uk/schools/primaryhistory/world_war2/
www.mybrightonandhove.org.uk
www.houzz.com
www.tripadvisor.com.pe
www.quieroirainglaterra.com
www.1900s.org.uk/1940s-bomb-shelters-morrison.htm